Higher on Heroine

Continuing with the archetypes, I’m adding what some fellow members of my women’s group have chosen for their heroines.

From Nic:

First heroine: “Missy” D., one of the first people I came to know that I would ever be content if I grew up to be like them. She is both a friend and role model. Ms. D. is a high-school arboriculture teacher and industry pioneer, she is among the first female career climbers, and an amazing kindhearted human being. She is unable to safely carry children of her own, but in place of them she is a second mom to countless high school students and took in and raised her sister’s children when they needed her. She comes from a rough childhood, and has raised herself to great heights. Both open minded and hearted, her guidance and acceptance help many young people decide what kind of people it they want to be with every fiber of her being, with the aid of simple motivational quotes posters across her classroom to sharing of her story and enthusiasm.  Gotta share my love for the her.  Who is all of five foot nothing by way, and can lift a man three times her size…. Fun times 😛

Second heroine:  Jo from Little Women. She refused to be boxed in by society’s standards for women, excelling in writing and being “boyish”. Instead of conforming Jo quietly went about being her own person, taking care of her sisters and friends in her own way: anonymously writing stories for a newspaper, cutting off her hair and selling it; playing the man in all of the sisters’ home shows; being blunt and unabashed; not afraid of a little dirt. Jo exemplifies what it means to just be yourself, even down to owning up to her flaws (a temper in her case). She just simply was. She didn’t go about making a show, she just was herself in all her glory every moment regardless of what others might say or think.

Winona Ryder as Jo from Little Women
Winona Ryder as Jo from Little Women

From Tiff:

My first choice for my archetype/hero is Ororo Munroe better known as Storm the mutant who can control all types of weather (and fly) from Marvel X-Men comic books which is not to be confused with the X-Men movie character Storm which in my opinion is an entirely different character. I started reading books and comics from a very young age and Storm was the first character that I could identify with as a black female.

For those of you who don’t know the character here is a quick backstory she was born to an American man and an African woman. While living in Africa with her parents her home was bombed and her family was buried under the rubble. Both her parents died but five year old Storm survived but experienced horrible claustrophobia due to the traumatic experience. Storm did not have her mutant powers yet and became a thief to survive. Fast forward a bit and Storm is being worshiped as a goddess in Africa due to her mutant ability to control the weather. After that she is contacted by Charles Xavier to join the X-men where she would eventually become one of their leaders. Storm has been a pickpocket/thief, Goddess, leader of the X-men (several times), leader of the Morlocks, a Goddess of Thunder, co-leader of X-force, a teacher, and the list goes on.

Storm is a very strong and noble woman who believes in protecting her friends and family. Her powers are quite formidable but she must always pay attention to her emotions because they can directly affect the weather. Storm is not someone who relies on her mutant power to win her battles. In fact one time she won a battle for leadership of the X-Men after her mutant powers were taken away from her. She is a true warrior in both body and mind but also someone who is gentle and kind. In the comics her bedroom looks more like it is a greenhouse. I think that is one of the reason I really loved her as a child. She was so strong to be able to defeat all these big bad male characters and yet she was like a nature spirit and would have chosen not to fight if she did not have to.

I chose Storm because she is an amazing, intelligent, and beautiful black woman. She does not hide her emotions because she has to be more honest with herself and others with her emotions. Otherwise her true feelings would show in the skies above her. She is a strong yet vulnerable character as she still suffers from claustrophobia but she does not let it stop her or define her. The picture I have chosen to go along with this shows some of the many different costumes that Storm has worn over the years.

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Habitat for Humanity: No Boys Allowed

2 months ago I learned of an opportunity to build for Habitat for Humanity in a unique setting.  The officers of SPIRALS were notified of an interfaith meeting for women only.  Since the president of SPIRALS and myself are both female, we signed right up for this.  The University director of religion and spirituality was quite adamant about having 2 Pagans be represented, so needless to say he was very pleased when we agreed to do it.

The first hour or so of the gathering was right on campus in the Student Union.  We enjoyed a free breakfast and introduced ourselves and a little bit about our experiences in the spiritual paths we follow.  There were 2 Muslims, a Buddhist, 3 Hindus and 2 Catholics.  One of the Catholics was from Germany.  She was studying abroad for a semester here at UMass.  Our supervisor was Jewish, but he was a male, ironically…We let him talk, anyway 😉

Since Nic and I were sitting next to the Muslim girls we ended up talking to them the most.  Believe me when I say I didn’t think 2 Pagans and 2 Muslims would have much to say to each other given our faiths seem to be on opposite ends of the religious spectrum.  We learned the girls are Pakistani descent, but if I remember correctly, they were born in the US.  They didn’t wear hijabs and everyone in the group was very curious to know why.  The girls explained that the hijab is totally a woman’s choice and is more cultural than religious, but is suggested in the Qu’ran.  They also said Islam is not a pick-and-choose religion.  You must follow the Qu’ran, entirely.  Of course once the other girls found out they were among witches (or a “cunning woman” as Nic prefers) they had many questions for us, as well.  Maybe that’s why we bonded so well with the Muslim girls…We both represent very misunderstood and negatively perceived religions and bonded over it.  If there’s one thing we really tried to have the girls understand about Paganism it’s that it’s all about the practitioner.  There is no sacred text or official doctrine to give guidelines or rules.  The only rule is you have the power to make things happen.

Then came the work!  Woo baby—it was COLD!  We bundled up well and once we arrived at the location, Nic and I volunteered to nail all the trusses and ceiling beams into place.  It was strangely satisfying banging a hammer all day.  Good way to let out frustrations.  We met the woman who was to be living in the house we were building and surprise—she’s Pagan.  We broke for lunch for a little bit and listened to soon-to-be occupant of the house tell us stories from her youth and give us advice as young women.  We made a lot of progress that day…I definitely remember more walls and roofs to the house as parts of the house that weren’t there when we started.  During clean-up, Nic and I power-swept the entire floor of all the leaves (so many leaves!), dirt and sawdust.  We made a dance-like race out of it.  When the supervisors commented on good we were with the brooms I said “It’s a Pagan thing”.  We all had a good laugh about that.

We made it back to the campus and filled out a sheet about our experience that day and some further info about our spiritual paths.  Larry, the supervisor then encouraged us to ask each other more questions about our faiths.  I jumped on that to ask the German girl if she noticed a difference between Catholicism in Germany vs. Massachusetts and she said “Yes, absolutely.”  According to her, the American Catholic services (at least the ones she has attended for students) seemed rushed and too judgmental.  In Germany, she has more time to meditate on her religious goal(s) during service and they seem to encourage spirituality more than condemning everyone who isn’t doing things the Catholic way.

We had more questions for the Muslims and they said in Islam women are very highly regarded and mothers, especially are supposed to be worshiped at their feet.  Since women give life, once they fulfilled their sacred duty of giving birth, nothing more is expected from them.  We talked about female oppression and one of the girls said “I mean, we’re both Muslim and I don’t think we look oppressed.  The women in places like Saudi Arabia, yes obviously they’re oppressed, but it’s because of the culture and Islam being used to fulfill the male-serving culture over there.”  One of the Hindu girls said pretty much the same thing about Hinduism…how women are very highly regarded and there is much goddess worship in the faith, itself, but the culture has now infused it with oppressing women.  She said men are favored more than women in India, culturally-speaking, and it shows in her family.

Another subject brought up was menstrual cycles (don’t ask me how that happened—but a room full of women—not totally shocking.)  The Muslims informed us that women are expected to rest during their menstrual cycle and refrain from domestic tasks especially cooking.  There is an Islamic belief that a, ovulating woman in the kitchen is not pure…Nic and I were quite confused by what that meant and we chimed in that many Pagan factions celebrate menstrual cycles.  We told all the girls about the rite of passage ceremonies for when a maid becomes a mother (translation: a girl gets her first menstrual cycle) and the blood is considered sacred and the essence of life; “Blood of the Moon” and how some believe using menstrual blood in a spell makes it more potent.  It was quite an opposite exchange of ideals.  Larry, the supervisor, even joined in and compared the ceremony to the Bar and Bat Mitzvahs of his tradition.  He said there are also some Jewish beliefs similar to the Muslim beliefs of a woman resting during her cycle and staying out of the kitchen.

This was a very eye-opening experience and I definitely see Islam, Catholicism and culture, in general in a different way.  I’m glad, too…I feel like I’ve been too manipulated by mainstream media and I’m thankful I was able to open myself to listening actual practitioners of the misconceived traditions.  Afterall, Nic and I were just trying to do the same for them about witchcraft.  So we all reached conclusion that religions themselves are not oppressive—men around the world just use them to oppress women.  We forgive you, Larry.  😉

Rites of Spring 36

This Memorial Day weekend, I was fortunate enough to attend a pagan retreat/festival with SPIRALS.  Since our club budget paid for our admission, it was free for most of us, which is quite nice, considering admission is minimum $225/person.  It’s even more expensive if we stay for the whole week.  Rites of Spring is held at YMCA Camp Hi-Rock on Mt. Washington, outside of Egremont, MA.  We were coming from Amherst so it was about a 2-hr drive to the MA/NY border.  Needless to say we got lost along the mountain’s rocky road of death (there goes reception) as night fell (cue thunderstorm) and almost missed the registration window.  We stopped in front of a creepy, lone mansion at a cliff-side intersection, hoping to ask for directions…Thankfully another car showed up on the road so I ran to them asking if they knew where camp Hi-Rock was.  They were a nice, late-middle aged British couple, saying they were also trying to find it.  They decided to chance it and go in 1 direction and I wished them good luck.  Eventually SPIRALS made it to the camp, but I never saw that couple again…Hope they made it.

SPIRALS goes to Rites of Spring!

SPIRALS goes to Rites of Spring!

Moving on; as soon as we get settled in our cabin and comb the pamphlet, deciding what to do, we figure we’ll start at the dining hall for warmth and free coffee.  Since I had the bright idea of wearing 1 of my belly dancing skirts, an elderly fellow in a tunic who was setting up an accordion said “You look ready to dance!” and swiftly grabbed my hand to use me as a demonstration dummy.  Minutes later, we somehow found out the man was teaching us Lithuanian folk dances.  Hey!—Why not?  Boy, it knocked the wind out of me!  They’re quite fast-paced male-female partner dances that involve a lot of spinning and running around in a circle.  2 of our SPIRALS member just gave up at 1 point and started improvising.  It was rather hilarious!  Deer decided to do that awkward, 70s interlocked-hands arm-wave and Grayson was spun around by Deer so fast, he spun out on the ground!

After all that madness, we headed to the bonfire circle that is held all night, every night during Rites of Spring and that’s where the magic happened for me.  There are no rules for how to dance, and I took full advantage of that.  When I got tired, I allowed myself to collapse at the edge of the circle in the grass and manifest the residual energy to my love.

Bonfire so energized, one of the poles fell over
Bonfire so energized, one of the poles fell over

The next morning, after breakfast, we all went our separate ways to go to our desired workshops/meditations.  I went to the tribal belly dance intensive…or at least I tried…several times!  I walked all over the damn camp looking for the class until I got so frustrated, I snuck behind the boathouse on a lake-side rock and just meditated to my iPod for a bit.  A traditional Arab belly dance song rejuvenated my desire to find the class, so I got up and went back to the dining hall to double check the location—they had moved it.  -_-  Well, by the time I got there, the women of the class were doing a circle-dance exercise and they let me squeeze in.  I picked up the moves pretty fast.   The instructor had us partner up for an exercise where we undulated our chests out and up then slowly waved/flattened our backs against each other’s.  It was an interesting physical experience.

My secret hiding place
My secret hiding place

I had started to feel a little uneasy the longer I was at Rites of Spring until that belly dance class.  Sadly, because of how I grew up, I have a lot of figurative walls around me and I often find many pagans awkward and patronizing.  Not trying to shit on the pagan scene but I feel as though lots of pagans (as with any other clique in life) come into paganism for not very admirable reasons…I felt more at home with the belly dancers as they/we tend to be very comfortable in their own skins and that restored my hope.

Later, in the afternoon, the ladies of SPIRALS attended another dance workshop about the community dances of Ghana & Cuba.  The instructor was something else.  She was about 4’ tall and built like a brick house.  She was quite firm in her methods and had very funny ways of relating the dances to us.  Apparently, Americans stand up very straight, whereas the rest of the world doesn’t really do that.  We had to allow ourselves to hunch and become almost animal-like by nearly dancing on all fours.  She taught us how to listen for subtle cues in the drumming of when to heighten the intensity of the dance.  The 3 of us weren’t feeling the dance after a while so we relaxed on the dock outside of the lodge until the Web-Weaving ritual which was led by the Lithuanian family.  The giant drum really set the mood in an eerie way…then the singing started.  All of the singing throughout the weekend felt quite dated, like 60s gospel songs.  I couldn’t get into it.  Although, towards the very end of the ritual, a bunch of wee tykes spontaneously decided to run around the May pole which was the most hilariously cutest thing we saw all weekend. 😀  They couldn’t have been more than 3 years old.

We are weaving the Web of Life
We are weaving the Web of Life

Shortly after the Web-Weaving ritual, Asherah & I went to Sunset Story Time.  We heard 3 very good stories around a small bonfire and then, the little ones danced around the fire.  The adults were trying to encourage children to have their own bonfire dance, so that’s why such a small fire was made.  Watching kids dance is the best!  They’re still figuring out how to move their bodies, yet couldn’t care less if that factor made them look ridiculous!  It’s inspiring watching how uninhibited and joyful they are by them merely doing whatever they want to the sound of music.

I spent the rest of the evening with Asherah and we got hot chocolate to chat with some of her friends she had met at last year’s Rites of Spring.  We went to a makeshift café to listen to some classical Lithuanian music until she fell asleep on me.

The
The “A” Team 😉

Earlier in the evening I talked to Apple & Alex about the discussion they attended for Indigenous Religions of Lithuania.  I was really interested in it, but I was committed to the belly dance workshops and schedules conflicted with each other.  The gist of it was that the native religions were based largely on farming/fertility cults and they identify as Christian out fear of persecution.  The family that was invited as guest ritual leaders by EarthSpirit explained that they were sort of the high priest/ess that was called for extra help in their village in Lithuania.  It sounds pretty old school to me, but I like it because it reminds us how paganism was permanently established.

Belly dancers weaving the Web of Life
Belly dancers weaving the Web of Life

The next morning, I went to the belly dance workshop with Asherah (on time, now) in the field where the May pole/Web of Life was held.  After lunch, a bunch of us went to a discussion group about LGBTQ paganism.  We discussed the younger generations having a blueprint or set of role models of how to integrate themselves within the pagan community via LGBTQ identity.  One elder fellow in neon purple panty hose and leather high-heeled boots brought up a workshop he did in the past called Invoking the Fabulous, regardless of one’s sexual orientation.  We all requested he bring that workshop back.  You KNOW I’ll be at that workshop!  One point he made was “We’re all born naked; everything else is drag.”  I immediately thought “YES!  This guy gets it!”

After the discussion, Asherah convinced the rest of SPIRALS to watch the Auction.  The second half of the auction involves young people volunteering themselves as wenches for the feast later that night.  Although all of the money is given to EarthSpirit to help fund the event, the wenches still get very into the spectacle of the auction.  People do athletic tricks and most of the men perform parodied strip teases.  The wenches are bought by fellow attendees to serve them at their feast table.

Grayson decided to auction himself to Chippendales
Grayson decided to auction himself to Chippendales

After the auction, Deer invited me to go to a Viking blot with her.  I initially wanted to go, but when I got there, I realized I would have to wait for opening ceremonial rites to proceed and I just didn’t feel like sitting through that.  I’m a hedge witch by nature which means I tend to minimize all the pomp and circumstance.  I don’t do cakes and ale.  I don’t call the quarters.  Sometimes I don’t even cast a circle.  Upon explaining it to my boyfriend, I realized all of that ritualized ceremony distracts me from the real magickal workings.  It doesn’t help set me in the mood; I’m much better at diving right in.  So I retreated to my secret lake-side rock and listened to more music.  I noticed beaver dams in various parts of the lake and started to imagine what this place was like before civilization.  It was already pretty untouched, which certainly helped, but it connected more to Mother Earth by pondering it.

After about an hour of that, we headed back to the cabin to get ready for the feast!  We dressed in our most elegant witchy-wear.  We saw some groups had decorated their own tables (we were quite impressed by the vikings’ table.  They had evergreen branches for centerpieces and drinking horns at each place.)  After we consumed more food than we could possibly shove into our stomachs, some folk music started playing and Deer & Rowan joined in on the dancing.  Asherah said next year we should decorate our feast table for SPIRALS and I like that idea!

Feasty witches!
Feasty witches!
Witch-Housemates
Witch-Housemates
Post-Feast Folkdance!
Post-Feast Folkdance!

As the night went on, some of us strayed to the bonfire circle and I felt like I actually DID something!  Not that the other stuff was meaningless, but when I dance, I feel accomplished and productive.  I guess that’s why I enjoyed the belly dance workshops so much…Anyway, the bonfire was started by one of the ritual leaders from the Web Weaving.  He had quite an impressive opening statement:

“Here we stand at the original nightclub, the first theme park, the first restaurant, the first house party.  All of these things try to capture and recreate the energy of a bonfire.”

…YES! 😀  I’m so glad someone else could put that feeling into words for me–for us!  When the drums started, I slowly started swaying into the music.  I built up the energy and manifested that via dance to the music.  I let the drums lead my pace and I felt like, for the first time, I was relying on instinct but knowing what I was doing, simultaneously.  Not only did I ride the wave, I worked with it.  The atmosphere was perfect.  I couldn’t have asked for a better way to end the final night at Rites of Spring.

The next morning, we cleaned up our cabin and got breakfast as usual.  Afterwards, most people went to the closing ritual, but I was ritualed-out by then.  Grayson recommended that we ground ourselves before leaving so quickly.  I’ve been hearing that suggestion a lot, lately and my instinct usually tells me “Witches are made to fly.”  I never really saw the point of grounding, nor was I sure exactly what it was, until we made our way home.  For the ladies of SPIRALS, our grounding process was listening to music while enjoying the scenic drive home.

Deer making Rowan our new friend
Deer making Rowan our new friend

Upon reflection of this event I can say I learned a lot about myself, which is the driving force behind my pagan practice.  Deer and I both came to the conclusion that we are more witches than pagans (although I use the terms interchangeably, some people seem to mean something more specific when they speak those words).  We’re both primarily solitary practitioners and not so much into the “Kumbaya” community-gatherings.  They were nice, but just don’t do it for me, all the time.  I also came to realize I do much better work when there are only females present, preferably ones I know somewhat intimately.  There is something spiritually sacred about being a woman and when a group of us come together, on our own, no words can express the intuitive energy we exchange between each other.  We don’t need words for it.  We don’t even need to look at each other to know.  We just feel it when we are in each other’s presence.  There is a sense of security we feel amongst each other’s company and we know we are in a safe place.  Call it sisterhood, if you will.

Well, before I stray too far from the subject at hand, I’ll get back on track by saying I was very lucky to attend an event like this for free.  FL has something very similar to this during Beltane and Samhain (since the weather’s camp-friendly all year round), called Florida Pagan Gathering (that might be the organization running the events…I can’t remember).  I’d say I dipped my toe into this experience, not totally immersing myself into the culture of the festival.  If I’m able to attend next year, I will be much more willing to interact in more rituals (all ceremonial distractions aside) and meet new people.  I didn’t quite step outside my comfort zone, but I’m glad I took it easy.  I feel like it was a trial period and I’m ready to do it again, with more drive.

I wish you'd been there
I wish you’d been there

Wiccan Reads: Long hair excerpt from “The Dancing Goddesses”

Lately, I’ve been reading a book that will be on WiccanReads hopefully soon.  There is a section of it, however, that I found more relevant to “She’s as Tousled as a Witch”.  The excerpt started explaining a ritual done around Beltane in old pre-modern Bulgaria.  Girls would pick herbs they believed to have potent magic before sunrise and mix it with water to wash their hair with it.  They hoped the herbs would make their hair grow thicker and longer.  For millennia, Europeans believed a woman’s fertility comes from her hair.  When a girl reaches adolescence, she grows pubic hair and is able to bear children.  This sign of fertility extended to hair on their head, as the dancing sprites, who are embodied fertility, have long, thick hair.  These willies, vila, rusalki, mermaids, etc. are often depicted combing water out of their long hair onto the ground which makes the crops grow.

A mermaid combing that infamous, long hair
A mermaid combing that infamous, long hair

Grass skirts were worn by these young women to represent both pubic hair and scalpal (is that a word?)  hair.  Also fringes along shoulders, ankles and wrists represented women’s hair as a sign of sexual maturity.  Even in modern times, fringes are a (typically feminine), earthy fashion statement.

Fringe bikinis are all the rage, lately.  Plainly obvious as to why!  So cute!  Gotta get myself one!  :D
Fringe bikinis are all the rage, lately. Plainly obvious as to why! So cute! Gotta get myself one! 😀
Oooh, look at that!  I did get one B-)
Oooh, look at that! I did get one 😎

Also touching on the hair-covering aspect of the earlier post; Married women covered their hair because their fertility now belonged to their husband, alone…Of course this should go without saying, but, a woman’s fertility belongs solely to her, because realistically, how do you own fertility without being physically attached to it?  This is just another form of patriarchal ownership and keeping one’s own power under someone else’s control.  Before I go off on a huge rant, I think this paragraph is better expressed in the original post towards the very bottom.

Traditonal Orthdox Jewish wife
Traditonal Orthdox Jewish wife